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Samara Madrid Akpovo

Associate Professor

Biography

Samara Madrid Akpovo is an Associate Professor in the Child and Family Studies department. Her research agenda has grown out of an enduring interest in the emotional lives of adults and children in early childhood classrooms using collaborative ethnographic research methods and micro-level discourse analysis. She has developed two primary lines of research: (a) examining preschool children’s gendered emotional themes and peer culture play, and (b) examining emotional dimensions of early childhood teachers’ classroom practices in the United States and Nepal. A central theme in her research has been to challenge and deconstruct normative ways of thinking about and being with children, families and teachers in diverse social and cultural contexts.


Research

  • Emotional lives of children and adults in early childhood classrooms
  • Gender, emotion, and children’s Play
  • Peer and school cultures
  • Cross-cultural research, discourse analysis and classroom ethnography
  • Emotional experience of international teaching

Education

  • Ph.D., Teaching and Learning: Early Childhood Education, The Ohio State University, 2007
  • M.A., Experimental Psychology, San Jose State, 2000
  • B.A., Psychology, University of Hawaii-Hilo, 1998

Curriculum Vitae


Awards and Recognitions

  • Innovative Course Grant, University of Wyoming, Outreach Programs, 2017
  • David Bauer Faculty Fellowship Grant, University of Wyoming, 2016
  • Global Studies Research Grant, Center for Global Studies, University of Wyoming 2015
  • Outstanding Research & Scholarship, University of Wyoming, College of Education, 2014

Publications

Selected Recent Publications

Books

Madrid Akpovo, S., Moran, M.J., Brookshire, R. (in press). Collaborative cross-cultural research methods in early care and education contexts. New York: Routledge.

Madrid, S., Fernie, D., & Kantor, R. (Eds). (2015). Reframing the emotional world of early childhood classrooms. New York: Routledge.

Fernie, D., Madrid, S., & Kantor, R. (Eds). (2011). Educating toddlers to teachers:  Learning to see and influence the school and peer cultures of classrooms. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press.

Book Chapters

Thapa, S., Madrid Akpovo, S. & Young, D. (in press). Collaboration as a healing research tool: The narratives of three early childhood researchers. In S. Madrid Akpovo, M.J Moran, R. Brookshire (Eds). Collaborative cross-cultural research methods in early care and education contexts. New York: Routledge.

Madrid, S. (2013). Care as a racialized, critical and spiritual emotion. In C. Dillard & C. Okpalaoka (Eds), Engaging culture, race, and spirituality in education. New York: Peter Lang.

Madrid, S. & Katz, L. (2011). Young children’s gendered positioning and emotional scenarios in play narratives. In B. Irby & G. Brown (Eds.), Gender and early learning environments. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.

Madrid, S. (2011). Romantic love among peers in the preschool classroom.  In D. Fernie, S. Madrid, & R. Kantor, (Eds.), Educating toddlers to teachers:  Learning to see and influence the school and peer cultures of classrooms. Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press.

Refereed Publications

Madrid, S., Baldwin, N., & Belbase, S. (2016). Feeling culture: The emotional experience of six early childhood educators in a cross-cultural context. Global Studies of Childhood, 8(3), 1-16.

Kalen-Ventura, K,  & Madrid, S. (2015). Promoting authentic learning: Visual arts in early childhood classrooms. Wheelock International Journal of Children, Families, and Social Change.

Madrid, S. (2013). Playing aggression: The social construction of the “sassy girl” in a peer culture play routine. Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood, 14(3), 242-255.

Madrid, S., Baldwin, N., & Frye, E. (2013). Professional feelings: One early childhood educators discomfort as a teacher and learner. Journal of Early Childhood Research, 11(3), 274-292.


Contact Information

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